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Thématique :
- Cancer colorectal (CCR)
- Colo-proctologie
Originalité :
Intermédiaire
Solidité :
Intermédiaire
Doit faire évoluer notre pratique :
Pas encore
 
 
Nom du veilleur :
Professeur Frank ZERBIB
Coup de coeur :
 
 
Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
  2019/04  
 
  2019 Apr;321(14):1370-1379.  
  doi: 10.1001/jama.2019.2402.  
 
  Effect of High-Dose vs Standard-Dose Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Progression-Free Survival Among Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The SUNSHINE Randomized Clinical Trial.  
 
  Ng K, Nimeiri HS, McCleary NJ, Abrams TA, Yurgelun MB, Cleary JM, Rubinson DA, Schrag D, Miksad R, Bullock AJ, Allen J, Zuckerman D, Chan E, Chan JA, Wolpin BM, Constantine M, Weckstein DJ, Faggen MA, Thomas CA, Kournioti C, Yuan C, Ganser C, Wilkinson B, Mackintosh C, Zheng H, Hollis BW, Meyerhardt JA, Fuchs CS  
  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30964527  
 
 

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

In observational studies, higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels have been associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if high-dose vitamin D3 added to standard chemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with metastatic CRC.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Double-blind phase 2 randomized clinical trial of 139 patients with advanced or metastatic CRC conducted at 11 US academic and community cancer centers from March 2012 through November 2016 (database lock: September 2018).

INTERVENTIONS:

mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab chemotherapy every 2 weeks and either high-dose vitamin D3 (n = 69) or standard-dose vitamin D3 (n = 70) daily until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) assessed by the log-rank test and a supportive Cox proportional hazards model. Testing was 1-sided. Secondary end points included tumor objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and change in plasma 25(OH)D level.

RESULTS:

Among 139 patients (mean age, 56 years; 60 [43%] women) who completed or discontinued chemotherapy and vitamin D3 (median follow-up, 22.9 months), the median PFS for high-dose vitamin D3 was 13.0 months (95% CI, 10.1 to 14.7; 49 PFS events) vs 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.5 to 14.0; 62 PFS events) for standard-dose vitamin D3 (log-rank P = .07); multivariable hazard ratio for PFS or death was 0.64 (1-sided 95% CI, 0 to 0.90; P = .02). There were no significant differences between high-dose and standard-dose vitamin D3 for tumor ORR (58% vs 63%, respectively; difference, -5% [95% CI, -20% to 100%], P = .27) or OS (median, 24.3 months vs 24.3 months; log-rank P = .43). The median 25(OH)D level at baseline for high-dose vitamin D3 was 16.1 ng/mL vs 18.7 ng/mL for standard-dose vitamin D3 (difference, -2.6 ng/mL [95% CI, -6.6 to 1.4], P = .30); at first restaging, 32.0 ng/mL vs 18.7 ng/mL (difference, 12.8 ng/mL [95% CI, 9.0 to 16.6], P < .001); at second restaging, 35.2 ng/mL vs 18.5 ng/mL (difference, 16.7 ng/mL [95% CI, 10.9 to 22.5], P < .001); and at treatment discontinuation, 34.8 ng/mL vs 18.7 ng/mL (difference, 16.2 ng/mL [95% CI, 9.9 to 22.4], P < .001). The most common grade 3 and higher adverse events for chemotherapy plus high-dose vs standard-dose vitamin D3 were neutropenia (n = 24 [35%] vs n = 21 [31%], respectively) and hypertension (n = 9 [13%] vs n = 11 [16%]).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Among patients with metastatic CRC, addition of high-dose vitamin D3, vs standard-dose vitamin D3, to standard chemotherapy resulted in a difference in median PFS that was not statistically significant, but with a significantly improved supportive hazard ratio. These findings warrant further evaluation in a larger multicenter randomized clinical trial.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01516216.

 
 
Question posée
 
La vitamine D à forte dose permet-elle d’améliorer le pronostic des cancers colorectaux avancés en chimiothérapie ?
 
Question posée
 
La réponse est non pour l’objectif principal qui portait sur la survie sans progression.
 
Commentaires

Par rapport à l’étude japonaise publiée dans le même numéro du JAMA, celle-ci paraît plus pertinente car ciblée sur des patients atteints de cancer colorectal avancé en chimiothérapie. Les effectifs sont peu importants mais a priori une erreur de type II a été écartée. L’effet sur des objectifs secondaires incite à refaire des études, comme souvent…

 
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